I am starting to believe it is in the most barren places that the world creates the 
most beautiful things. A rainbow sunset that paints the desert sky,  a mountain covered in 
plush green trees, and a Hindu Mandir in the suburbs of Los Angeles. 
Just off the 71 freeway in Chino Hills, California, surrounded by new homes, and 
industrial buildings there is a temple that houses traditions from one of the oldest 
religions in the world. 
 Shri Swaminarayan Mandir nearly blends in with the surrounding tan and 
sand beige buildings. However, what does stand out is its intricacy and the instant beauty
it emulates. 
As I walked out into the 90 degree day toward the Mandir, I instantly realized how 
tranquil it felt. The grounds were oddly silent considering its position right next to the 
freeway, yet somehow it was noiseless. It was the type of silent that I have felt before 
around places with great spiritual means. 
Since it was still morning it was nearly empty, but there were a few men, women, 
and children moving about from building to building. Some of them wore tradition 
clothing while others did not. 
I slipped off my sandals and felt the warmth from the sun, not quite burning but 
enough to make me walk quickly up the steps of the Mandir.  As I did so I was drawn by 
the delicate carvings that decorated the entirety of the temple. My eyes were filled, and as 
soon as I focused on one aspect of the architecture my eyes were drawn somewhere else. 
 Before entering into the temple I noted the signs requesting the turning off of cell 
phones and the practice of silence; two things most of seldom do. 
IMG_1485
Once I opened the wood carved doors I understood the importance of those two 
requests. Inside the temple was the same intricate carving that covered the ceilings, walls, 
and pillars but in a white marble. The time, energy, and love that was put into this detail 
would not have been appreciated nearly as much if the presence of phones and 
conversations were allowed; and for that I was thankful. 
The square shaped room had a series of pillars leading toward the middle where 
there were a series of Mandir Shrines. Lining the sides of the room were more Shrines . 
Some people stood, others sat, or knelt showing reverence to the sacred images. Some 
people sat in meditative prayer as the soft backdrop of traditional music played creating 
an even greater spiritual pull. 
There was an energy present in the Mandir that was undeniable. It was humbling to 
watch others in their space of worship and to observe the rituals and characteristics that 
bring THEM closer to God. 
When I felt ready, I explored the interactive exhibit that was held downstairs. The 
exhibit delved deeper into the meaning of the Mandir and the cultural practices of 
 
Hinduism.  What resonated with me most was the emphasis placed on love and 
selflessness. 
Prior to my visit to this Mandir I had little knowledge of India and the cultural or 
religious practices. I had no idea the richness and vibrancy that is found not only in the 
architecture, but in the belief systems that hold them together as a people. It is not about 
exclusivity but being inclusive; that was what struck me the most. 
Walking out of the temple there was an energy surrounding my friend and I that we 
didn’t want to break. The feeling was similar to when finishing a mediation or yoga 
practice. The air is still, your heart and mind are calm, and the world feels a little less 
scary and a little more like an adventure waiting for you to gently create a footprint. 
 
-Em 
“A Mandir is a place of paramount peace…to realize God” 
– H.H. Pramukh Swami Maharaj 
IMG_1484
Shri Swaminarayan Mandir, Chino Hills- California 
Link to my blog | Creatingfootprintsblog.wordpress.com