As the first introduction to Japan for many visitors, Tokyo has a lot to offer with its 

plethora of neon lights, restaurants, and entertainment. After about 4 days 
though, the crowds and commute between one tourist spot to the next can be 
draining. Since a number of mountain ranges and national parks are within easy 
reach, it would be a waste not to balance your trip with some quiet time in nature. 
So here are five worthwhile day hikes to add to your Tokyo itinerary.

 

 

Mt. Takao
Mt. Takao is easily the most popular hike because of its close proximity to Tokyo 
and therefore is often flooded with tourists and Japanese people alike. If you’re 
looking for peace and quiet, it’s not the place to go, but the beauty of the trails 
and the view from the top are not to be discounted. It’s best to go early in the 
morning on weekdays as there will be fewer crowds, and it’s a great hike to kick 
off the autumn hiking season. 
There are a number of trails you can take to the top, some more strenuous than 
others. For a good workout on the ascent, take Trail #6 and on the way back 
down, take Trail #1 to check out a few of the different attractions on the mountain 
like the monkey park.
How to Get There: From Shinjuku Station, take the JR Chuo Line to Takao 
Station (roughly 40 minutes), then transfer to the Keio Line and ride one more 
station to Takaosanguchi Station.
 Takao
Mt. Tsukuba 
With the exception of the sunrise from the top of Mt. Fuji, the view from the top of 
Mt. Tsukuba is the best out of any of the mountaintop listed here. There are 
unobstructed views for as far as the eye can see. When you reach the top, 
there’s a rock edge where you can sort of climb out and sit down to enjoy the 
view as everyone behind you snaps their pictures. It’s a real “sitting on top of the 
world” kind of feeling, and Tokyo feels universes away. Mt. Tsukuba is a fun, 
challenging hike that requires great concentration in some areas and one that 
demands a sturdy pair of hiking boots and even walking sticks, if you feel so 
inclined. Parts of the trail are steep and require minor rock climbing skills, but 
don’t let that deter you. It’s all in the name of good exercise. Families with small 
children as well as elderly folks frequently and successfully challenge this trail so 
if they can do it so can you.
How to Get There: From Akihabara Station, take the Tsukuba Express Line 
(roughly 50 minutes) to Tsukuba Station. Outside of Tsukuba Station, take the 
Kanto Tetsudo Bus (roughly 40 minutes) to Tsukuba Jinja Iriguchi. Station staff 
are available to help guide your journey, if you have any questions.
TsukubaFeet
Kamakura/Enoshima 
Kamakura is home to some easy hiking trails and one of the most impressive 
Buddha statues in Japan. Just standing before it is a cleansing experience. From 
Kita-Kamakura Station, you can hike the Daibutsu Hiking Course to the entrance 
of the Great Buddha Statue. It’s best to go hiking in the morning when it’s cooler 
and spend the rest of the day in Enoshima.
Enoshima has a gorgeous coastline where you can go down and dip your feet in 
the water, go fishing, try catching crabs, walk along the water, or just sit still with 
nothing but the ocean in sight. You can also buy a giant squid chip the size of 
your head for an afternoon snack. Both Kamakura and Enoshima offer a nice 
afternoon away from the hustle and bustle of Tokyo.
How to Get There: For Kamakura, take the Yokosuka Line from Tokyo Station 
(roughly 52 minutes) to Kita Kamakura Station. For Enoshima, take the JR 
Tokaido Line from Tokyo Station or the JR Shonan-Shinjuku Line from Shinjuku 
Station to Fujisawa Station (roughly 45 minutes) and transfer to either the 
Enoden (10 minutes) or Odakyu Railway (7 minutes).
IMG_1096
Shosenkyo Gorge 
My heart melts when I think about Shosenkyo Gorge. The first time I went with 
friends, we just sat up at the top for a bit and let the whole world dissolve away. 
Shosenkyo is part of Chichibu Tama Kai National Park, and out of all the hikes 
I’ve done in Japan, Shosenkyo was the hardest place to leave because nature 
and time stand still here. Such stillness provides a different kind of quiet at the 
top like the world beyond where you are sitting is still spinning, life is still moving 
forward, but you can’t hear a thing. It’s so glorious. Plus, if you go during autumn, 
the colors are to die for. 
How to Get There: From Shinjuku Station, take a direct limited express train 
(roughly 90-100 minutes) bound for Kofu Station. From Kofu Station, buses to 
Shosenkyo Gorge leave in front of the station once every 1-2 hours. They bus 
ride takes roughly 30 minutes to the Shosenkyo-guchi stop.
Shosenkyo copy
Lake Kawaguchiko 
Lake Kawaguchiko is part of the Fuji Five Lakes district that is a popular 
destination during cherry blossom season, autumn, and New Year’s. The area 
offers the best views of Mt. Fuji anywhere in Japan, and it’s also a photo hotspot 
with walking and hiking trails aplenty. The Japanese people treasure the diamond 
of a mountain that is Mt. Fuji and work hard to maintain and preserve the 
environment around it. From the opposite side of Lake Kawaguchiko, Fuji stands 
tall in all its majesty and grandeur. Walking around the whole of the lake, it’s 
nearly impossible to take your eye off of the pearl at the center. 
How to Get There: Check out Japan Guide’s info page on how to reach the Fuji 
Five Lakes area.
Bonus: If you’re in the area, take a trip to the Fuji Forest Adventure Park. It’s a 
5-part ropes course complete with ziplines at the base of Mt. Fuji. On a clear day 
there are gorgeous views of Fuji abound when you’re up high playing in the 
trees. In order to get to the park, you’ll need a car because the trains and buses 
will only take you so far. Taxis are an option of course, but it’ll be a wallet drainer. 
Get here if you can though because the air is so crisp and fresh, and the whole 

area just feels so secluded, it’s fantastic.

 

IMG_1670

 

FIND KIMI HERE
Twitter | @SushiyamaTravel
Instagram | @SushiyamaTravel